Scooter Accidents Sky-Rocket

0

Scooter riders are constantly being asked to use the road with care, and be mindful of other road users. This message is now being further pushed as it was reported that 17 person were already involved in scooter related accidents this year.

In announcing that it would be participating in educational efforts the Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) cited the disquieting 2017 figures as well as statistics for the previous years. It was also reported that the RVIPF in 2015 recorded 40 scooter accidents, while 54 accidents were suffered in 2016 – mind boggling to say the least.

It was also pointed out that this year’s average is higher than previous years as there was one scooter related fatality since 2014.

In response the DMV mentioned that it joined with the RVIPF in an outreach programme to sensitise scooter riders of the importance of safe riding on the Territory’s roadways. DMV Commissioner Kye Rymer stated, “We are concerned with the increase in scooter accidents and have found it important to lend our voice and personally reach out to scooter riders about wearing safety gears and riding safely on the road.”

The outreach programme commenced on 27 March at the Virgin Islands School of Technical Studies and the St. George’s Secondary School, and Mr. Rymer explained that some scooter riders are in high school: “We are starting at the school level, as you can obtain a scooter licence at the age of 16. So we thought it necessary to go into the schools and speak to those scooter riders and potential scooter riders in order to educate them on road rules and regulations of our Territory.”

The Road Traffic (Motor Vehicle Registration and Operation, and Driver and Vehicle Licensing) Regulation 29(1) (a) states that a person may learn to drive a motor cycle at the age of 16 and above. A Motorcycle/Scooter Written Test must then be completed, a learner’s permit when learning to ride obtained, and the Motorcycle/Scooter Road Skills Test successfully completed to obtain a scooter licence.

Share.